Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Silk "Paper" Bowls -- Leaf Motif

As you can see from the title, I've made several silk paper vessels/bowls using leaves as my theme. I love all things nature, especially leaves, trees, and flowers. These were made using different techniques, which I will explain. Please do this for me -- pick your favorite one and write why in the comments section.

Bowl 1 = Threadpainted silk paper that had leaves captured within the layers (hard to see), with dyed silk organza backing, made using Laughing Cat pattern. It was cut in the shape of a leaf with slits that when sewed up, made it into a 3-d bowl. I used 5 different threads and gold angelina. Dimensions are 15" long x 10" wide x 2.5" high.

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Side View







Bowl 2 =  Extra large bowl with trapped skeleton leaves on inside, with multiple colors of silk. After it was dry it was too thin so I added another layer of purple over it. It has a nice look inside and out. Dimensions are 14" diameter x 6" high.


Side View

Top View
























































Bowl  3 = Undyed silk paper bowl with silk paper leaves. These leaves were made one per day on a clay mold that had the veins prominent. I free motion stitched these veins and then stitched them onto the bowl. I also transferred an image of a single maple leaf onto the bottom of the inside using L.Rileys TAP. But I didn't like the way it came out (some of the paper wouldn't come off), so I stitched on one more silk paper leaf. However in the bottom view you can see the transferred image. Dimensions are 12" diameter x 5" high.

Side View

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Bowl 4 = Dark green bowl with one mulberry leaf (purchased) placed on the bowl mold before adding the silk caps This is made from 3 thin silk caps, making the bowl translucent in places. I left the ends to hang naturally and not cut them off. Plus I added silk ribbon and green leaf beads around the top of the bowl. Dimensions are 6" diameter x 4.5" high.

Top View

Side View


Bowls 5 and 6 = Bowls using the same mold (a cereal bowl), trapping skeleton leaves inside. The colors are different and I created them by spritzing dye on the finished mold of undyed silk caps (instead of dying the silk beforehand). This is a technique I came up with while playing; I haven't seen it anywhere in the books. I kind of like it...especially the possibilities, which are endless. Dimensions are 6" diameter x 4.5" high.

Top View

Side View

Top View (with bowl on its side). Sorry 'bout the bkgrnd.

Side View


So there you have it for now. Which one or ones do you like and why? BTW I've got a lot more silk paper creations in the works. My mind is overflowing with ideas; I just wish there were more hours in the day!

Thursday, March 17, 2011

More with Silk Paper

Now that I had the various techniques down and had acquired more silk fibers, I started dying my own silk and working with the different TYPES of silk and making more art. Here's a sampling:

Here is a piece of silk paper that I made into a vase. This method requires the paper being made flat, heavily stitched in a sandwich of Vilene or Solvy. I used various shades of color, copper leaf, and copper thread. I sewed it to a round piece of copper for the bottom, added some wrinkles and folds for interest and stitched copper oak leaves around the top. It stands about 12" high and 4" in diameter.



Close-up detail of the top of the vase/vessel



























































Here's another vessel of the same material. The vase is considerably thinner in diameter and stands straight up (for the most part). I cut out copper mesh leaves and stitched them on the side and put copper beads on the top and bottom.





























Close-up detail of the top half



























Here's another take on the formed vase method, only in blue with silver metallic stitching and beads and gorgeous iridescent blue-green leaf beads on the top. This time I used Throwster's Waste silk, which is short-fibred and curly.
 






The following is a multicolored piece of silk paper made from mawata caps. I made it into a silk-lined clutch by fusing Pellon heavyweight stabilizer in the middle of a sandwich of silk. I'm going to embellish it more and add a clasp of some kind.















The following art is silk paper molded into or over an item, such as a bowl, a vase, and silicone candy molds.

First is a purple/maroon thick piece of tussah silk molded over a regular day-to-day cereal bowl. I took it off the mold before it was completely dry, which resulted in the way it stands crooked. Learned a good lesson there. I finished it off by stitching on shell beads. It was incredibly easy to hand-sew through this thick piece of silk paper (about 1/4" thick at the top).







Next I molded multi-colored dyed mulberry silk (which is considerably more expensive than tussah) over a wide-mouth flower vase. This time I made it thinner and waited longer for it to completely dry. When it was dry I spritzed some pearly powder contained in an alcohol ink to give it this cool iridescence. This is gorgeous in person...the pictures don't do it justice. The first two pics are views from one side, then the other; then a view from above. I still have to embellish it...maybe I won't...we'll see.








Here we have silk mawata caps dyed in various shades of green and molded in a two-piece (a top and a bottom to create the veins) silicone candy mold of a leaf: an aspen leaf and a separate maple leaf. The maple leaf is as big as my hand. I make one every two days until I have enough to put on a piece of artwork. The ideas are just swirling around in my brain -- silk paper is incredible!













































NEW -- Silk Paper

I love all things silk. So when I saw a book on sale at Joggles whose title was "Silk Paper", I bought it on impulse, wondering what it was all about. This book inspired me greatly and literally changed my life. It is so easy to make, so beautiful to touch and look at...that I've been gathering supplies and making silk paper to the exclusion of everything else for the past two weeks. Here is some of what I've created; hope you likee!

This is one of the first pieces I made. I bought someone else's dyed tussah silk in various colors from Etsy and layered it with some wool roving to get the layered effect taught in the book. It ended up being very thick which I don't like very much. But it got me hooked and I started to experiment...

Purple and Pink silk paper - 36"w x 24" h
This is another of my earlier attempts. I made a sheet of maroon paper and one of pink. They were boring on their own so I decided to weave strips together. It is embellished with silver foil swirly figures.


Close-up detail



 
This piece is gossamer thin and made with dyed green mawata caps. I inserted dried rose pieces into the paper. Ignore the masking tape at the top where I taped it to the window to show the transparency.
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 This pic above is the same piece of silk paper laid down on white cloth.
 
detail close-up
 The piece below is made from bits of silk noil fiber stitched with metallic thread, all sandwiched with vilene on top and bottom. It shows bits of the silk worm's cocoon and is of undyed natural fiber. I had plans originally to make this into something but decided it was so beautiful on its own. I did stitch it to a piece of Habotai silk. This pic shows the masking tape, as I took this photo against the window to show the delicate transparency.
 This pic is of the same piece laid down on the countertop.


Close-up detail































This silk paper is made from mottled green mawata caps and inserted mulberry paper leaves bought at Michael's. I like how the color from the leaves bleeds. This piece was made using Golden Gel semi-gloss heavy medium.


Close-up detail
 This is a rather large piece where I used specialty paper bought at my local art store, which had bits of leaves on a white mulberry bark surface. I laid strands of undyed  and dyed silk tussah on top and bonded it together with the Golden gel mixture (watered down). None of these 3 pics show the true color and interference glossiness. I got that by adding Golden's green interference medium to my mixture.

Close-up detail
another pic w/better color